This is not a crisis centre – CASP provides educational material and resources.
The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (CASP) provides information and resources to reduce the suicide rate and minimize the harmful consequences of suicidal behaviour.

 Approximately 11 people will end their lives by suicide today in Canada. Awareness is essential to changing this behaviour. Understand why people consider suicide and attempt to take their own lives.Read more
Suicide is preventable. Many factors and circumstances can contribute to someone’s decision to end his or her life. Find out how to recognize the warning signs and learn the importance of talking about suicide.Read more
Are you having thoughts of suicide? Do you know someone who has experienced suicidal thinking? Help save lives. Our guide to early responders shares tools to assist you in intervening when someone is at risk.Read more
If someone you know has died by suicide, you are not alone. The fact that someone died by suicide does not diminish our right and need to celebrate their lives and accomplishments. We’re here to support bereaved survivors in the process of healing.Read more
Suicide is a serious public health issue that affects us all. Help us raise awareness and reduce the number of suicides by educating the public and changing the way people think and talk about suicide.Read more

CASP Statement on Physician Assisted Death

The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (CASP) is pleased that the federal government legislation on medical assistance in dying, introduced in the House of Commons On Thursday April 14, 2016, recognizes suicide is a significant public health issue that can have lasting and harmful effects on individuals, families and communities.  CASP would like to remind everyone that we are not speaking about suicide when we talk about physician assisted death.  To provide the appropriately balanced ongoing discussion and policy/legislation developments, physician assisted death needs to take place in the context of the implementation of a key strategy for suicide prevention.  Additionally, we are reminded that the six key recommendations of The Federal Framework for Suicide Prevention Legislation have not yet had an opportunity to be released.

CASP is heartened by the fact that the proposed legislation is attempting to strike a balance between the wishes of Canadians who choose to seek medical assistance in dying with protecting the interests of vulnerable persons.

CASP will continue to provide a voice through this process and encourage suicide prevention and increased resources to be made available to all Canadians.

Centre for Suicide Prevention infographic and statement.

 

CASP thanks Calgary teen for taking action against Amazon

CASP reached out to CBC and Maggie Harder thanking her for her courage to challenge Amazon’s selling of insensitive and disrespectful suicide t-shirts.  The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention completely agrees with Maggie and applauds her approach.  These shirts are very insensitive and can be very triggering, especially for those struggling or those bereaved by suicide.  While humour is an important coping skill for all of us, these t-shirt designs cross a line and further stigmatize those struggling.  There are other ways to begin dialogue about this important topic, such as the t-shirts in  Waterloo Region that  focus on the positive message “My Life Matters.”  We are blessed to have young ambassadors in Canada and proud to have Maggie tackling this cause.  Maggie, CASP would be happy to work with you on the movement to stop this material through our social media and website.

You can read the entire article here:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-teen-amazon-mental-illness-shirts-1.3391187?__vfz=tc%3DdjBdljUiP_0

 

CASP Announces Awards Winners at Annual General Meeting

Service Award: This award is awarded for outstanding leadership in suicide prevention, intervention or postvention at the community, regional or national level in Canada. This year CASP has elected two winners who have engaged in service delivery, advocacy, and service development that has led to a reduction in suicide or its harmful consequences; Susan Roach, Manager at Achieve Mental Wellness and Recovery Centre in Haldimand Norfolk, Ontario and Francoise Roy. Susan is described as having ‘walked the talk’ and is an inspiration to many who have had the privilege to work with and know her. She is a speaker who shares her story, connecting with many along the way. Her passion and expertise has realized a huge impact for so many including the poster campaign that Susan helped develop to tell the stories/journeys of individual members highlighting choices they have made to achieve wellness and recovery. Francoise Roy holds a master’s degree in training and has specialized in suicide prevention and development of prevention programs for 30 years. She has been involved in various organizations that work to develop the skills of workers and trainers in suicide prevention with a particular interest in sharing her knowledge with crisis workers.

Susan Roach award CASP award Francoise

Media Award: The purpose of the CASP Media Award is to promote and acknowledge responsible and positive media coverage on the topic of suicide. The media plays an important role in suicide prevention, through education and information – to help shatter the myths and taboo of suicide. This year’s award recipient is Ted Michaels, News Anchor for CHML 900 Radio in Hamilton who has been instrumental in doing just that. Ted has implemented a weekly show called Wellness Wednesdays highlighting mental health, mental illness and suicide featuring topic experts and individuals with lived experience. Ted’ show demonstrates the positive role media can play in providing education and making suicide an acceptable topic to speak about.

Dave Masecar Community Wellness Award acknowledges outstanding leadership in suicide prevention, intervention and/or postvention in and/or by a First Nations or Inuit Community that has led to a reduction in suicide or its harmful consequences. Congratulations to Cecile Guerin for her outstanding leadership in suicide prevention and community-capacity building across Nunavut, specifically for her tireless efforts in suicide prevention, postvention and intervention for Nunavummiut.

Cecile Guerin award

President’s Award – Awarded by the President each year to an individual who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in the advancement of suicide prevention. Renee Ouimet, current CASP President, was delighted to give this award to Dr. Ian Manion. Ian is a strong champion for child and youth mental health issues and youth suicide prevention across Canada in both his clinical practice and as the founding director of the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health where he held the role for eleven years.

Ian Manion award

Congratulations and thank you to all of the Award winners for the significant work they do. We also wish to recognize those who take the time to submit nominations. In addition we wish to recognize that there are many individuals, communities and organizations that are working together making significant contributions to Suicide Prevention, Intervention and Postvention in Canada that were not recognized here but play an important role each and every day. Collectively, we are making a difference.

Additionally, CASP would like to announce the following new board members who were voted onto the CASP Board at the annual general meeting: Ken Reddick, Francoise Roy, Sanj Malik, Normand d’Aragon and Nancy Moreau Battaglia. Welcome!

For more information please contact:
Tana Nash, CASP Executive Director at tnash@lutherwood.ca or by phone at 519-884-1470 ext. 2143

 

After a Suicide: Surviving a Suicide Loss

 

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